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Interference

Situation 1

A Team A player loses his stick during play and grabs a stick out of an opponent’s hand. He then continues to play with the opponent’s stick. Should the Referee assess a penalty for this action?

Yes. The Referee must assess the Team A player a minor penalty for Interference. Rule References 625(a.5 or 6).

This action is considered to be preventing an opponent from retrieving his stick.

Situation 2

Team A shoots the puck from behind the center red line so as to constitute possible icing. A player of Team A who is on-side and eligible to play the puck attempts to do so in his Attacking Zone before the icing occurs. The goalkeeper of Team B shoots the broken portion of a stick so as to interfere with the attacking player who is not yet in the vicinity of the puck. What procedure is employed and what penalty is assessed to the goalkeeper?

Allow the play to be completed and assess a minor penalty to the goalkeeper. Rule References 625(a.7) and 637(a).

Even though the stick was thrown in the Defending Zone, the stick was not thrown or shot at the puck, thus a penalty shot cannot be applied.

Situation 3

A player who is about to come onto the ice plays the puck with his stick. However, that player has either one or both skates still on the bench. What penalty, if any, shall be assessed.

A minor penalty. Rule Reference 625(a.9).

A player’s skates must not be in contact with the bench in order for him to participate in the play. This ruling would apply whether or not the team has the correct number of players on the ice. In the case of a player entering or leaving the players’ bench who intentionally plays the puck with one or both skates on the bench, the same ruling would apply.

Situation 4

A player on the players’ bench who is not readily identifiable interferes with a player on the ice. What action, if any, should be taken by the Referee?

The Referee must identify one player of the offending team and a minor penalty must be assessed. Rule Reference 625(a.9).

The penalty is not a bench minor. Therefore, the Referee must determine which player must serve the penalty.

Situation 5

What penalty is imposed when a player on the players’ bench interferes with the movements of the puck when his goalkeeper has been removed?

A minor penalty. Rule Reference 625(a.9).

The same is true if the player had interfered with an opposing player.

Situation 6

The spare goalkeeper on the players’ bench interferes with a player on the ice. What penalty should be assessed and who should serve it?

The Referee must assess a minor penalty to the spare goalkeeper, to be served by a player, other than the goalkeeper, who was on the ice at the time of the infraction. Rule Reference 625(a.9).

This makes the ruling regarding who serves a penalty consistent with a penalty to the goalkeeper on the ice and a bench penalty.

Situation 7

May a player who has control of the puck back into the goal crease (the goalkeeper is in his crease) prior to the puck going into the crease?

No. Rule References 625(b).

Even if a player has possession and control of the puck, unlike carrying the puck over his attacking blue line, he is not permitted deliberate entry into his opponent’s goal crease ahead of the puck, unless the goalkeeper is out of the crease. Should this occur, play must be stopped (and any resulting goal disallowed) and the ensuing face-off must be held at the nearest Neutral Zone face-off spot.

Situation 8

A defending player shoots the puck into his own goal from outside the crease with an attacking player standing unimpeded in the crease (the goalkeeper is in the crease). Does the goal count?

No. Rule Reference 625(b).

Regardless of what player puts the puck into the goal, no goal may be scored if a player of the attacking team intentionally stands in the goal crease, with the goalkeeper in the crease, unless the puck is already in the goal crease.

Situation 9

The goalkeeper leaves his crease to stop a shot. Before he can return to his crease, an attacking player enters the crease before the puck, and a teammate shoots the puck into the goal. Is the goal legal?

Yes. Rule References 625(b & a.8).

If the goalkeeper is completely out of his crease, an attacking player may precede the puck into the crease and any legally scored goal in this situation shall be allowed.

However, if the goalkeeper is attempting to return to the goal crease and there is any interference by the attacking player who prevents the goalkeeper from making a play, then the goal must be disallowed and an interference penalty shall be assessed.

Situation 10

When the attacking team has possession of the puck in its Attacking Zone, should the Referee stop play and require a Neutral Zone face-off every time an attacking player places his stick and/or skates in the opposing team’s goal crease?

No. Rule Reference 625(b).

Play should not be stopped because a player momentarily places his stick and/or skates in the goal crease, unless he interferes with the goalkeeper in any manner. However, if a goal is scored while an attacking player has his stick and/or skates in the opponent’s goal crease while the goalkeeper is in the crease, the Referee shall have no alternative but to disallow the goal.

Situation 11

A member of the attacking team passes the puck to a teammate. While the puck is en route, another member of the attacking team positions himself in the goal crease, with the goalkeeper in the crease. Should the Official stop play and conduct the ensuing face-off outside the Attacking Zone?

Yes. Rule Reference 625(b).

With the goalkeeper in his crease, no member of the attacking team can be in the goal crease if his team has possession of the puck. In this instance the team still has possession of the puck when the infraction occurs, thus the play must be stopped immediately.

Situation 12

An attacking player carries the puck into his opponent’s goal crease. The goalkeeper knocks the puck away from the attacker and out of the crease, but another attacking player immediately gains possession and shoots the puck into the goal while his teammate is still standing in the crease. The player in the crease has not been interfered with and the total elapsed time between when the puck is cleared from the crease and when it is shot back into the crease is at most one second. Should the goal be disallowed because of the player in the crease?

Yes. Rule Reference 625(b).

At the time the shot was taken, an attacking player was illegally in the crease.

Situation 13

In the process of playing the puck, an attacking player, falls down and slides completely inside the goal frame. The player is behind the goal line and is not interfering with the goalkeeper. At the same time, another attacking player shoots the puck and it enters the goal, completely crossing the goal line. Should this goal be allowed?

Yes. Rule Reference 625(b).

Even though the player is in the back of the goal he is not in the goal crease area as the rulebook defines it. The goal crease area does not extend into the goal, but rather stops at the goal line. In order for the goal to be allowed, the player must not interfere with the goalkeeper in any way.

Situation 14

The goalkeeper, in the act of proceeding to his players’ bench, leaves his stick in front of the goal. What happens if the attacking team shoots the puck which hits the goalkeeper’s stick, while the goalkeeper is still in the act of leaving the ice?

A goal shall be awarded. Rule Reference 625(c).

For a goal to be awarded, the goalkeeper must either be in the act of leaving the ice or actually off the ice.

Situation 15

The goalkeeper, in the act of proceeding to his players’ bench, unintentionally bumps into another player and loses possession of his stick in front of his goal. The goalkeeper does not retrieve the stick and continues to the bench. The puck then hits the stick. Is a penalty required in this situation?

Yes. A minor penalty or an awarded goal if the stick prevented an obvious and imminent goal. Rule Reference 625(c).

It makes no difference whether or not the goalkeeper deliberately left his stick in front of the goal. It is the responsibility of the goalkeeper to keep the area near his net clear of objects that may prevent the scoring of a goal.

Situation 16

A team pulls its goalkeeper for an extra player. The goalkeeper, before leaving his crease, places his stick across the front of the goal. Meanwhile his team scores a goal. The Referee, upon looking back to the other end of the rink, 

observes the stick across the front of the goal. What action should be taken?

The Referee shall allow the goal and assess the goalkeeper a minor penalty. Rule Reference 625(c).

It is the responsibility of the goalkeeper to keep the area near his goal free of any obstacles that may prevent the scoring of a goal. However, there is no rule to warrant the disallowing of the goal.

Situation 17

The goalkeeper, in the act of proceeding to his players’ bench, deliberately places his stick across the goal mouth. What happens if a teammate of the goalkeeper inadvertently shoots the puck that hits the goalkeeper’s stick?

A goal must be awarded to the non-offending team if the contact prevented a goal. Rule Reference 625(c).

This ruling applies whether the goalkeeper is off the ice or in the act of leaving. If the stick interfered with the puck, but not to prevent a goal, then a minor penalty would be appropriate.